Prosecco Wine Price


If France has its wines, Italy has Prosecco. Although wines are undoubtedly the better ones, Prosecco has its own charm.

Prosecco is a kind of sparkling wine that is being produced in Veneto, Italy, particularly in the Valdobbiadene region. The name came about as obviously, it is made of Prosecco grapes, now known as Glera.

Although it is similar to champagne, it comes from a more affordable production method called “tank method”.

The History of Prosecco

Prosecco traced its roots in Italy, particularly the nine provinces spanning the regions Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia. TheProsecco Wine name prosecco came from the old name of a village which is now known as Trieste, Italy.

Prosecco is considered as Italy’s Denominazione Di Origine Controllata (DOCG) which literally means “controlled and guaranteed designation of origin”. It is considered the highest classification of wine in Italy.

As mentioned, this wine is made from Prosecco grapes, now known as Glera grape within the EU. However, 15% of it is allowed to be blended with other permitted varieties.

Prevalent styles are sparkling (Spumante) and semi-sparkling (Frizzante), although still white wine (Tranquillo) is also allowed. The term Prosecco (Prosecho) was first recorded and attributed to an Englishman named Fynes Moryson when he visited a place in northern Italy in 1593.

In 2018, approximately 600 million bottles of Prosecco were produced. This is a far cry from the production of about 150 million bottles 10 years prior to that, which proved its meteoric rise in popularity around the world.

How to Find High-Quality Prosecco?

When looking for the real deal Prosecco to get the unparalleled quality, you need to know some technical terms. This will also help you spot fake ones which have been abundant in the market.

For starters, DOC stands for ‘designation of controlled origin’. On the other hand, DOCG stands for ‘designation of controlled origin and guaranteed’. These two abbreviations are a must-have, along with the ‘Product of Italy’ to ensure that you are buying the real thing.

At times, the bottles also have a barcode that you can take a picture of to verify if it’s authentic or not.

As for the Prosecco DOC, the Spumante has bubbles that last and is the most popular variety. The Frizzante, on the other hand, has fewer bubbles, while the still wine called Tranquillo has no bubbles at all.

The Prosecco Superiore DOCG has two varieties, namely; the Prosecco Conegliano Valdobbiadene Superiore DOCG and the Asolo Prosecco DOCG. The first one is being made within the towns of Conegliano, Valdobbiadene, and Vittorio Veneto. The latter is one being produced in the Asolo town.

The Consorzio of Prosecco Conegliano Valdobbiadene Superiore DOCG has introduced Rive delimitations composed of 45 subzone wines from 15 communes. The names were taken from each hill where the grapes used in producing them originate.

Valdobbiadene Superiore di Cartizze DOCG is produced in the hill of Cartizze and has recently been named simply as Superiore di Cartizze without the Prosecco. This is to emphasize the territory where it came from.

It is believed that Cartizze grapes were last to be harvested because they are in the steep slopes, so naturally, they are hard to reach.

Price of Different Prosecco

Below are some of the different Prosecco wine prices by brands and varieties:

Prosecco Varieties

Volume

Price

Alberto Nani Organic Prosecco

750 ml

$25

Armani Prosecco

750 ml

$17

Armani Prosecco DOCG

750 ml

$20

Barefoot Bubbly Prosecco

750 ml

$8

Bartenura Prosecco Sparkling

750 ml

$23

Bellissima Prosecco

750 ml

$22

Belvino Prosecco Extra Dry

750 ml

$7

Borrasca Prosecco DOCG

750 ml

$15

Bottega Oro Prosecco

750 ml

$30

Botter Prosecco Frizzante Spago

750 ml

$13

Cavit Prosecco

750 ml

$14

Chloe Prosecco

750 ml

$13

Cupcake Prosecco

750 ml

$10

FitVine Prosecco

750 ml

$16

Foss Marai Prosecco Brut Guia Millesimato

750 ml

$30

Foss Marai Prosecco Strada di Guia 109 Brut

750 ml

$23

Foss Marai Prosecco Strada di Guia 109 Extra Dry

750 ml

$23

Gemma Di Luna Prosecco

750 ml

$21

Giuliana Prosecco

750 ml

$17

InVino Prosecco

750 ml

$13

Josh Cellars Prosecco

750 ml

$14

La Delizia Prosecco

750 ml

$12

La Delizia Prosecco Frizzante

750 ml

$10

La Marca Prosecco

750 ml

$13

La Vostra Prosecco

750 ml

$11

Luna d’Or Prosecco Brut

750 ml

$15

Luna d’Or Prosecco Extra Dry

750 ml

$14

Luna d’Or Prosecco Frizzante

750 ml

$11

Menage A Trois Prosecco

750 ml

$11

Mionetto Prosecco Brut

750 ml

$12

Nino Franco Prosecco Rustico

750 ml

$14

Pizzolato Fields Prosecco

750 ml

$13

ReaLuna Prosecco

750 ml

$15

Rebuli Prosecco

750 ml

$30

Riondo Prosecco

750 ml

$12

Rivata Prosecco

750 ml

$13

Ruffino Prosecco

750 ml

$12

Santa Margherita Prosecco

750 ml

$22

Santi Nello Prosecco Superiore di Valdobbiadene

750 ml

$16

Syltbar Premium Prosecco

750 ml

$20

Tesoro della Regina Prosecco

750 ml

$16

Voga Prosecco

750 ml

$13

Zonin Prosecco

750 ml

$15

Properties

A 5-oz. serving of Extra Dry Prosecco with 11% ABV is said to have around 91-98 calories and around 2.6 carbohydrates.

Expect to smell fabulous aromas in Prosecco. Your nose will be filled with exuberant aromas of flowers and fruits. Add to the list would be a hint of banana cream, hazelnut, honeycomb, tropical fruits, green apple, honeydew melon, pear, and honeysuckle.

Its texture is more on the frothy side with bubbles that usually disappear immediately, although not as fast beer. And since it smells sweet, expect it to be on the sweeter side of the wine varieties.

How sweet Prosecco wines can be depends on how they are labeled, namely:

  • Brut – the sugar level per glass can be up to half a gram
  • Extra Dry – the sugar level per glass can be over half a gram
  • Dry – the sugar level per glass can be up to 1 gram.

Serving Suggestions

Ideally, Prosecco should be served at 38–45 °F or 3–7 °C in a tulip glass. It resembles flute glasses but a bit different in that tulip glasses allow more air space. This is more advantageous since, as mentioned, Prosecco’s bubbles dissipate quickly, so it helps preserve the bubbles because of its larger bulb.

Although Prosecco has the reputation of wine best taken before a meal, it definitely won’t disappoint being served with the main entrée.

Since Prosecco is a bit sweet, it would be a perfect pair for fruit-based appetizers and cured meats. Asian dishes can also be paired like spicy curries, especially from Southeast Asia.